Through his eyes – 36

Few years later, on the same ground the entire neighborhood stood again looking at a house which was just two houses away from the tailor’s house where Dulal Pal, the young Naxal was murdered. It was not for the departure of a soul but for the arrival of a soul, a young unmarried girl, who was in her seventh standard got pregnant. It was not known if the pregnancy was the result of rape or love affair. Her father, who was working in a ship, had to travel most of the time and the mother of the girl had to look after her two children, the girl and her elder brother. The family could not maintain the watertight secrecy about her pregnancy and someone had informed the police about it. One afternoon the entire house was cordoned by police and they scared the mother by saying that suo moto action would be taken to nab the culprit who made her daughter pregnant and the matter would eventually be dragged into court &C. The scared mother, being alone with her son and daughter while her husband was in a ship and could not be contacted as there was no telephone anywhere nearby, gave the police all she had, her jewelry and cash as bribe and begged them not file any complaint against any one. If it ever became known that her unmarried daughter was pregnant, the girl’s life would be ruined and the family would be ostracized. The police left immediately after collecting the booty. The family left the village that night and was never seen again.

The corpse was lying for about an hour before police arrived. The murder took place in broad daylight in presence of many eyewitnesses. The victim was walking alone on a street in ward no. 3, the area generally controlled by Naxals where the presence of any CPI(M) party worker was unexpected. While walking, he suddenly realized that he was being followed by a group of people who were armed. He immediately started running and those who were following him started chasing him. He entered into ward no. 4, probably thinking that there he would find few of his Naxal comrades who would provide resistance. But that day was not his lucky day; he could not find any of his comrades. He entered into a house which belonged to the local tailor called Abinash Dey also popularly called ‘Abinash Khalifa’. He quickly slipped under a wooden cot in one of the bedrooms. The miscreants, not knowing the exact house where he was hiding searched every single house in the vicinity including the tailor’s house. They could not find him in their first search attempt. Then for some reason, which remained unclear to everyone, they decided to search only the tailor’s house again. They switched on the lights of every single room of the house and discovered him under the cot. They pulled him out and stabbed him with a long knife. His lifeless body remained lying on the floor in pool of blood.  When police arrived, they started scolding the tailor’s wife when they came to know that while the victim was bleeding profusely he asked for some water and the lady brought him a glass of water which he drank while she was holding the glass with one hand and holding his head the other. The body was sent for postmortem but no one was arrested.

That night was one of the worst nights for the villagers. CPI(M) workers walked into each and every house, started destroying cooked foods, breaking furniture, kicking men, insulting women even started pulling women by hair. What surprised people the most was that not a single Naxal was seen with any of their looted guns standing beside the villagers. Everyone was surprised by their sudden disappearance.

Next few days CPIM workers were seen roaming around in the streets with firearms, collecting money from each and every house, insulting men and women, even old people were not spared. The two young men who were leading the campaign of atrocity were the son and the nephew of the local communist party leader, who few years later became the transport minister of the state.

Email: mintughoshal@gmail.com

Follow him on facebook: mintu.ghoshal.9

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s